Tag Archives: pkgng

pkgng without ports: addenda

Two things I forgot to mention in my previous post:

  1. In order to use OpenPAM from svn instead of the version that comes with FreeBSD, you need to copy security/pam_mod_misc.h and pam_debug_log.c into the OpenPAM source tree and adjust the Makefiles accordingly, otherwise FreeBSD’s service modules won’t run and you won’t be able to log in. I don’t plan to include this code in OpenPAM; I’d rather overhaul FreeBSD’s modules so they no longer need it.
  2. What I actually wanted to do, but didn’t because I needed a solution there and then, was patch automake itself to add a pkgng target so gmake pkgng creates a package with no additional input required (except possibly a +DESC file).

Creating pkgng packages without ports

Lately, I’ve been working on expanding the scope of OpenPAM to more than just a PAM library. Specifically, I’ve added support (in a separate library) for the OATH HOTP and TOTP one-time password algorithms. In the long term, I also intend to implement PSKC and OCRA, the ultimate goal being full compliance with the OATH client and server certification profiles. Part of the reason I’m doing this is that my employer needs it, which is why the University of Oslo holds the copyright on most of the OATH code, but it is also something I’ve been wanting to do for a long time, and which I believe will greatly benefit FreeBSD.

This is a large undertaking, though. I’m not comfortable rolling a new OpenPAM release with the OATH code at this time—and I probably won’t be for quite a while. I’ve created a “nooath” branch and may roll a release from that branch in order to get the many other OpenPAM improvements into FreeBSD 10.0, but that’s a different story.

In the meantime, I need a way to test my code; not just on a development machine, but also on semi-production systems such as my desktop and my home router. Once it’s tested, I also need a way to deploy it on mission-critical systems. All these systems have one thing in common: they are binary installations, maintained with freebsd-update rather than built from source. So I need a way to install a newer version of OpenPAM without disturbing the base version.

Continue reading “Creating pkgng packages without ports” »

Managing your own pkgng repository

[edit 2013-08-05: fixed a typo in the two command lines used to create the repo definition files, spotted by swills@]

Say you have your own poudriere and your own pkgng repo. You’ve set up Apache to point at your poudriere’s package directory:

<VirtualHost *>
  ServerName pkg.des.no
  ServerAdmin www@des.no
  DocumentRoot /poudriere/data/packages
  <Directory "/poudriere/data">
    Options +Indexes +SymLinksIfOwnerMatch
    IndexOptions +FancyIndexing +FoldersFirst
    Order allow,deny
    Allow from all
  </Directory>
</VirtualHost>

The 91amd64-default and 91i386-default directories are so named by poudriere because they contain the output of the 91amd64 and 91i386 jails, respectively, based on the default ports tree. These are details which you don’t necessarily want your clients to know (or need to know), so you create symlinks which match your clients’ ABIs:

# cd /poudriere/data/packages
# ln -s 91amd64-default freebsd:9:x86:64
# ln -s 91i386-default freebsd:9:x86:32

All you need to do on the client side now is:

# cat >/usr/local/etc/pkg.conf <<EOF
packagesite: http://pkgng.tsdutv.usit.no/freebsd:9:x86:64
EOF

Now, let’s think about this for a while. Every time you install a new machine, you have to copy or type in that pkg.conf, and while this is a pretty minimal example, your real pkg.conf could be much larger: you could have multiple repos, multiple servers with failover, etc. How about we fetch it from a central location?

# fetch -o/usr/local/etc/ http://pkg.des.no/pkg.conf

But what if it changes? Well, why not use the package system itself to distribute and maintain it?

We want to distribute our pkg.conf as a package, and since we want pkg to update it when it changes, we need to place it in a repo. We can’t stick it in the FreeBSD ports tree, and while it is possible to sneak it into the local copy of the ports tree that poudriere builds from, it’s not very convenient. So what we do is create an additional pkgng repo with only one package, which contains two pkg.conf files: one for our real pkgng repo, and one for the repo that contains our configuration package.

First, we create the contents of our package:

% mkdir des-repos
% cd des-repos
% mkdir -p usr/local/etc/pkg/repos
% cat >usr/local/etc/pkg/repos/des-packages.conf <<EOF
des-packages:
  url: http://pkg.des.no/${ABI}
EOF
% cat >usr/local/etc/pkg/repos/des-repos.conf <<EOF
des-repos:
  url: http://pkg.des.no/repos
EOF

Now we need a manifest:

% cat >+MANIFEST <<EOF
name: des-repos
version: 20130715
origin: local/des-repos
comment: Repository definitions for pkg.des.no.
arch: 
www: http://pkg.des.no/
maintainer: des@des.no
prefix: /usr/local
desc: Repository definitions for pkg.des.no.
categories: local, ports-mgmt
deps:
  pkg: { name: pkg, origin: ports-mgmt/pkg, version: 1.1 }
files:
  /usr/local/etc/pkg/repos/des-packages.conf: { uname: root, gname: wheel, perm: 0644 }
  /usr/local/etc/pkg/repos/des-repos.conf: { uname: root, gname: wheel, perm: 0644 }
EOF

Note that arch is intentionally left blank, as this package is architecture-neutral.

Once we have contents and a manifest, we can create the package file:

% pkg create -r $PWD -m $PWD
% tar tf des-repos-20130715.txz 
+COMPACT_MANIFEST
+MANIFEST
/usr/local/etc/pkg/repos/des-packages.conf
/usr/local/etc/pkg/repos/des-repos.conf

All that remains (on the server) is to create the repo:

# mkdir /poudriere/data/packages/repos
# cp des-repos-20130715.txz /poudriere/data/packages/repos
# pkg repo /poudriere/data/packages/repos
# cd /poudriere/data/packages
# ln -s repos/des-repos-20130715.txz des-repos.txz

Then, on each client (presumably including the server itself):

# rm /var/db/pkg/repo*sqlite
# rm /usr/local/etc/pkg.conf
# pkg add http://pkg.des.no/des-repos.txz
# pkg update

Tada!

The return of the FreeBSD desktop

I have a confession to make: I haven’t used FreeBSD as a desktop OS for years. The reason is twofold:

  1. Since 2005, my work has required me to run Linux (Debian and Ubuntu at Linpro, RedHat at the University of Oslo) and, briefly, Windows at Kongsberg Maritime. I eventually stopped using stationary computers, resorting instead to a (company-provided) laptop running either Ubuntu, or Windows with Ubuntu in VirtualBox.
  2. More importantly, around the time I started at Linpro, it became increasingly difficult to maintain a FreeBSD desktop. The modularization of X.org and the increasing complexity of desktop environments mean that the number of packages required for a complete desktop system has grown from a bit over 100 to well over 600 (in addition to the kernel and base operating system, which is monolithic in FreeBSD). The FreeBSD ports system does not scale well, and the lack of a proper binary update procedure makes it almost impossible to keep that many packages up-to-date.

This is about to change. Continue reading “The return of the FreeBSD desktop” »